Photography as a women’s leadership tool

Photography as a women’s leadership tool

Up until this past Friday, it had been 17 days since I had really spent some time photographing my kids using my DSLR. I know that doesn’t sound like a long time, and sometimes it isn’t, but this time, it was too long.

I was feeling disconnected, both from photography and, truth be told, my kids. I’ve been immersed in women’s leadership coaching and growing my business, and processing some different reactions to the things that are going on in the world right now too numerous to count or list.

Friday they had the day off school, and the weather was beautiful, so we headed out into the city, camera in hand. 

Equity by design - some key findings and recommendations

Equity by design - some key findings and recommendations

This week I was all set to talk about more concrete examples of using photography as part of your exploration into women’s leadership, but a couple of things happened last week that I want to talk about first.

Back when I was pregnant with my oldest son Liam (now 8), I worked with a group of women in the Women in Architecture Committee (WIA) of the American Institute of Architects (AIA) to try and create a survey to gather data on women in the profession. The survey never quite got off the ground, but I was thrilled a few years ago to find that a different group in San Francisco DID do a survey in 2014, which they then refined and repeated in 2016. This group is called Equity by Design.

This actually speaks to one of the 5 myths of women’s leadership that I talk about in the series - the myth that if you don’t do it, nobody will. Sometimes you do your best, and it’s not quite the right time and place, but if it’s work that needs to be done, it will find a way to be done.

What’s helping me right now

What’s helping me right now

Being present

I’ve always been terrible at meditation. I dropped out of yoga class in college (yes, it was yoga for credit!) because I couldn’t get my mind to quiet down.

But I’ve been doing 10-minute Headspace meditations for almost a year now, not every day, but almost every day. I can’t say that I’m that much “better” at it - my mind still wanders, some days more than others.

But I’ve learned that it’s ok.

Behind the scenes at Photosanity

Behind the scenes at Photosanity

The non-stop barrage of controversy, tragedy, terrorism, hate, corruption, bigotry and oppression notwithstanding, things have been busy here at Photosanity. 

You may have seen my previous posts about the 5 myths of women’s leadership and how to bust through them. I wrote them, and they currently exist as a series of emails, but when I finished writing them, I realized that what I have is the first draft of a book. So yes - I accidentally wrote a book! 

I haven’t made any definite plans for publication yet, but for now, if you haven’t already done so, you can sign up for the series here.

5 myths of women’s leadership and how to bust through them (whether you're an established or emerging leader, or don't even think of yourself as a leader yet)

5 myths of women’s leadership and how to bust through them (whether you're an established or emerging leader, or don't even think of yourself as a leader yet)

I won’t lie, it’s been an intense few weeks for me. I’m still reeling from Charlottesville, Harvey, Irma, DACA under threat, and the 16th anniversary of 9/11.

While these events don’t necessarily have a direct and immediate impact on my day-to-day life today, nonetheless it’s brought up a lot of feelings of trauma and grief for me, especially around my own experiences with race, immigration, and personal loss.

Add to that the usual September transition back to school. What I’m realizing based on stories from other parents is that the meltdowns and exhaustion of the first couple of weeks back are common amongst kids of all ages (as well as their parents!) It has been exhausting.

I’m also feeling stronger and clearer than ever before.

Preliminary women’s leadership survey results are in - your input still needed

Preliminary women’s leadership survey results are in - your input still needed

Preliminary women’s leadership survey results are in! Although the sample size is still small right now, what I’m seeing so far is really interesting.

What I’m seeing is that there is a lot of commonality in the challenges we are all facing, but when it comes to what we need help with, the responses get more specific and varied.

The third main question we asked was: what is the biggest change you could make over the next six months that would increase your impact and/or decrease your levels of stress and overwhelm?

This question had the widest variety of answers, with no conclusive frontrunner.

5 myths of women’s leadership - your input needed

5 myths of women’s leadership - your input needed

At Photosanity, women’s leadership is NOT just about your career, job, work or professional life.  

It is a holistic approach to aligning your life with your values, and who you are with how you present to the world. In this way, you can increase your personal and professional impact without sacrificing yourself in the process. 

Fill out this quick survey by September 8th, 2017, and the following week you’ll get the survey results plus our brand new "5 myths of women’s leadership" series delivered right to your inbox. You'll also get information on how to find out more if you’re interested in women's leadership coaching.

Shifting the narrative… and an announcement

Shifting the narrative… and an announcement

This is a conversation I had the other day with Liam, my eight year old, and Jack who is five.

Me: Good news - I am now officially certified as a women's leadership coach.

Liam: Yay!

Jack: Wait, does that mean you can lead planes now?

Me: No, I cannot lead planes.

Jack: Oh.

Good thing I don't use how impressed my 5yo is as a benchmark!

But yes, I am officially a Gaia Project Certified Women’s Leadership Coach. This program, and the work I did with my volunteer coachees, has been life-changing as far as how I see the role I can play in the world.

How becoming a parent can become the perfect catalyst for a new career

How becoming a parent can become the perfect catalyst for a new career

A couple of months ago, I had the pleasure of being interviewed by Lou Blaser of the Second Breaks Podcast, a show about what it takes to make a career move in today’s economy.

In the episode, we chat about my journey from architect to photographer to business owner, and the role motherhood played in that journey. 

The Resilience Through Joy Show - Episode 003: Joy Through Passion Projects

The Resilience Through Joy Show - Episode 003: Joy Through Passion Projects

Welcome to the Resilience Through Joy Show - Episode 003: Joy Through Passion Projects, a conversation with Beryl Ayn Young, founder of Recapture Self, a community for deeply feeling, giving moms who are ready to reclaim their identity beyond story reader, snack maker and boo-boo kisser.

Motherhood is a role that we love, but the day-to-day grind of being a parent can be exhausting and all consuming. However, it’s possible to be an amazing mom (even on the hard days), fiercely devoted to our families, while also making time for ourselves too. 

What if you could find joy daily, no matter what is going on in your life?

What if you could find joy daily, no matter what is going on in your life?

We’ve been wrapping up 7 days to finding joy though photographing your kids (even if you’re having the worst day) and on Monday I went live on FB to do an epic recap of each day’s challenge and some of my findings.

If you didn’t get a chance to join in on the challenge, this is a great 45-minute 7-days-in-a-nutshell recap, and if you prefer listening to watching or reading, you certainly can go audio only for most of the broadcast (although I do go on camera with my Timeshel prints and Rag and Bone Bindery albums and show MySocialBook and Chatbooks albums too).

The Resilience Through Joy Show - Episode 002: Joy Through Slowing Down

The Resilience Through Joy Show - Episode 002: Joy Through Slowing Down

Welcome to the Resilience Through Joy Show - Episode 002: Joy Through Slowing Down, a conversation with Allegra Stein, a Thought and Action coach who helps driven women move towards their big, scary ideas.

For ambitious and high-achieving women, slowing down might not seem feasible, let alone something worth considering as a means for achieving more. I’ll be chatting with Allegra about what can happen when we slow down, and where to start when we are all struggling to balance so many things. Why is slowing down important when there is so much more we want to do for ourselves, our families and our communities? 

Allegra is also a mom of two, and we’ll also talk about using photography to slow down.

This live interview series is a little bit of an experiment, but approximately weekly I'll be chatting with different interesting people like Allegra about a variety of methods of finding resilience through joy no matter what's going on in your life or in the world. This is all about increasing your personal and professional impact without sacrificing yourself in the process.

The Resilience Through Joy Show - Episode 001: Joy Through Decluttering

The Resilience Through Joy Show - Episode 001: Joy Through Decluttering

Welcome to the Resilience Through Joy Show - Episode 001: Joy Through Decluttering, a conversation with Amanda Wiss, founder of Urban Clarity, a professional organizing company that helps busy New Yorkers get out from under the clutter, streamline their spaces, and maximize their lives.

For many parents, clutter is a big thing that ends up stealing joy as all the toys, gear and clothes quickly get out of control. Amanda shared with us some practical tips as well as mindset shifts that can help create less anxiety and more joy in your home. 

Amanda is also a mom of two so towards the end of the show, we talked about how she finds joy through photography, and I answered some of her questions about organizing and decluttering your photos.

Cynical about joy? This is for you.

Cynical about joy? This is for you.

I used to be a lot more cynical and angry. I’ve mellowed out considerably over the years, but still, as a type A ambitious professional, I’ve never really considered myself a particularly warm or joyful person. 

In fact, when a colleague a few years ago commented on how warm I am, I was rather surprised.

Society ingrains all kinds of false dichotomies into us, and one of them is success vs. joy.

Photography, parenting and women’s leadership - and what they all have in common

Photography, parenting and women’s leadership - and what they all have in common

When I started Photosanity in 2011, I was a new(ish) mom and family photographer, and it was in response to a lot of questions I was starting to get from parents about taking better photos of their own kids.

 

So I developed a workshop that would teach parents just that, but not only how to take better photos, but how to handle the organizing, editing and sharing piece as well that can be so overwhelming.

 

However, from the very start, I always taught photography from the perspective of a mom who derived a great deal of joy and satisfaction from photographing my own kids, not just because of the resulting photos, but because of how my camera helped me to process the whole experience of becoming a mom.

The best way to get support for yourself as a working mom… and as a stay-at-home mom

The best way to get support for yourself as a working mom… and as a stay-at-home mom

This will come as no surprise to anyone, but being a mom is hard. And although I know this is an exaggeration, I feel like I would never have made it as a mom, had it not been for the amazing group of moms I met when Liam was around 6 or 7 weeks old.

We were all first-time moms with babies born within weeks of each other, and we met weekly at a local cafe, huddled over our nursing or feeding or sleeping or crying babies. We exchanged stories, information and commiseration from the front lines of those early and mysterious days of trying to figure out diapers, feeding and sleep schedules, postpartum recovery, and the crazy transformation we had experienced where we were now taking care of tiny, helpless, living, breathing, human beings outside of our bodies.

Photography as a source of joy, not frustration

Photography as a source of joy, not frustration

I was recently invited by Light.co, a brand new camera technology company, to write about how my photography career has evolved, along with my style and technique, in relation to technology. I thought this was such a great topic to write about, so here is my response.

And actually, it just so happens that I was doing some decluttering the other day and came across the very first camera that I ever owned. It was a small point-and-shoot, film of course, and I was in middle school at the time.

This was way before smartphone cameras or the internet became prevalent - in fact, people were only just starting to get “personal computers” in their homes. You took 24 or 36 photos per roll of film, took it to be developed, and a few days later, picked up your prints, and then mounted your photos into albums. I’m guessing most of you reading this are familiar with what I’m talking about, but our kids would be flabbergasted!

The biggest thing that gets between us and joy

The biggest thing that gets between us and joy

Last week, I talked about how joy is not just a “nice-to-have” but essential if you are to survive and thrive. Because what I’ve been exploring and experiencing these past few months is about how joy is an incredible tool for resilience.

As I was writing that post, I thought to myself that I would be interested to read and research more about joy (I’ve already been reading about resilience)… and so I’ve been reading The Book of Joy: Lasting Happiness in a Changing World based on a week of conversations between none other than the Dalai Lama, and Desmond Tutu, as told by Douglas Abrams - not a bad place to start, right?

Chills, I tell you. Just chills.