the photosanity blog | take better photos


How to capture in a more meaningful way the photo that every parent wants

How to capture in a more meaningful way the photo that every parent wants

We’ve been talking this past week about not asking your kids to smile and say cheese, and instead capturing natural emotions and interactions as they are engrossed in the things that they love.

We’ve looked at capturing the full range of emotions, not just the happy ones, as a means of validation as well as a much more rewarding approach to photographing your kids.  

If you’ve been following along with these tips, you already know by now how much confidence and joy you can experience daily when you broaden your concept of the moments that are photo worthy.

However, I know that you still want photos of your child smiling and looking at the camera - I do too!

How photography can be a surprisingly helpful parenting tool during difficult moments

How photography can be a surprisingly helpful parenting tool during difficult moments

We’ve talked about how, up until now, you might have considered “photo-worthy moments” to be those where everyone is happy and smiling at the camera. 

And while we all want our kids to be happy, that one emotion alone is not all that we want for them, nor is it all that we value or love about them.

We want to honor and validate their feelings — all of them.

Do you find your photos fail to capture what you experienced in the moment?

Do you find your photos fail to capture what you experienced in the moment?

One frustration that I hear over and over from parents is that they struggle to capture in photos the feeling they were experiencing in the moment. 

There are many many reasons for this, and my first suggestion is always to focus on how it feels, not how it looks as you will find that your photos start to become like shorthand notes to yourself about what you are feeling in the moment.

But I know that you want more than that. 

Use your camera to connect with your kids

Use your camera to connect with your kids

Do you want to capture the moment, but worry that your camera will come between you and your kids?

Does your camera seem to ruin the moment because when you bring it out, your kids stop what they are doing and either start posing, making silly faces or turn away?

Do you find yourself missing the moment because by the time you pull your camera out, it's too late?

What photographing your kids has to do with what you most want as a parent

What photographing your kids has to do with what you most want as a parent

Thank you so much for sharing with me what it is you most want as a parent. It has really been an honor to be entrusted with this information. I have a table set up to automatically populate with the results and I just love seeing each response come in. It feels good to see so many parents raise their hand and say yes, this is what I want. We don’t really get to do that much, do we?

But what does this have to do with photographing your kids?

What do you most want as a parent?

What do you most want as a parent?

I can’t even remember now why I started to think about this question, but once I did I was really curious. What is it that you most want?

I polled parents in a few Facebook groups that I’m in, but I’m curious to know what you think, so I would love it if you could let me know. And then in a couple of days I’ll tell you what this has to do with photographing your kids, deal?!

What people are saying about the free 7 day challenge...

What people are saying about the free 7 day challenge...

Have you signed up for the next free 7 day challenge yet?

If you're not sure about signing up, here's what some of our past participants said they liked most about the challenge:

I like that it made me look for something specific and loved the interaction on FB with everyone... great seeing other people's pics and struggles. - Brigitte Hradsky

What makes Photosanity different?

What makes Photosanity different?

Last week I talked about using photography to connect with your kids and be more in the moment with them. Photographing your child can be a meaningful rather than a utilitarian endeavor. Your camera can change how you experience a moment, not just help you capture it.

Yet most photography courses take the opposite approach.

Why the Royal Baby's first photos are important for moms, never say cheese and more

Why the Royal Baby's first photos are important for moms, never say cheese and more

A photo lesson from Kate Middleton

I was so excited to find out that the first photos released of Princess Charlotte with her older brother Prince George were taken by none other than Princess Charlotte’s mother, the Duchess of Cambridge herself!

The reason Kate Middleton’s baby photos are exciting to me is because, as much as I believe in professional family photography (not to mention being a professional family photographer myself!) my first passion is encouraging and empowering parents to take their own photos of their kids.

Read more on Mom365.

 

Travel back to the moment with natural smiles and photos that show real life

While I wouldn’t say that I have a photographic memory, I have a very strong visual memory. When I look at a photo, I can usually remember the moment and the context, even if the photo itself doesn’t offer many clues. The photo brings me back to the moment, which is one of the reasons why I don’t like to ask my kids to smile for the camera. That doesn’t create a moment I want to remember; in fact, it does the opposite.

One downside to this is that my kids have absolutely no idea how to smile nicely for the camera. This is most obvious in group photos with other kids. Everyone is smiling and looking at the camera except my kid who is either grimacing or distracted and looking elsewhere!

I wouldn’t have it any other way, though. My memories are more important than a smiling photo, and the smiling photos I have are all the more treasured for being natural.

Read more on Mom365.